'Starry Night' by Vincent van Gogh

Vincent van Gogh | Image No. 17667 | Wish list
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Artwork: Starry Night
Artist:Vincent van Gogh
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Vincent van Gogh - Starry Night
    
   
    

A closer look: 'Starry Night' by Vincent van Gogh

The usual impression of a romantic starry night simply does not appear when you look at this late Impressionist work. The painting, created in 1889, seems too restless, confused and too stirring. Taking into account the circumstances under which Vincent van Gogh created the picture, the "Starry Night" exhibited in the Museum of Modern Art in New York suddenly unfolds its own fascination. Vincent van Gogh painted them during his stay in the St. Paul de Mausole mental hospital, to which he had been instructed to relieve his brother Theo. The artist, who comes from the Netherlands, was only allowed to move on the premises of the clinic when accompanied by a carer, so that the "starry night" is probably like a view from the hospital room. In addition to the real impressions of nature, the artist's inner tension also flows into the painting. Vincent van Gogh gives them expression through the sky-blazing trees in the front and the wave-like hills in the background. But even the namesake lights of the "starry night" are not a resting point. In the center of the picture they form a huge vortex that threatens to swallow everything up - a sign that Vincent van Gogh also felt threatened by apparent fixed points in his life, and this feeling is intensified for the viewer by the colors that the artist believes in chose his "starry night": yellow penetrates the rational, mind-controlled blue - the tone that in many cultures is ambiguous and often indicates danger. Even if Vincent van Gogh worked with expressive colors in many works, he will have been aware of the warning and signaling effects of yellow.